Non-Damaging Megasonic Chip Cleaning Process

Technology #ua13-026

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Categories
Researchers
Srini Raghavan
Professor, Materials Science & Engineering
Pierre Deymier
Department Head, Materials Science & Engineering
Manish Keswani
Assistant Professor, Materials Science & Engineering
Managed By
Robert Sleeper
Licensing Manager (520) 626-4604

Invention

Faculty at the University of Arizona propose a new low power process to eliminate particles on a patterned wafer without damaging its fragile features. The process greatly improves cleaning efficiency and is commercially viable for microchip manufacturers. The concept of cleaning patterned wafers using Megasonic bubbles is novel and provides a solution to develop and clean complex microchips. This new technique reduces the nanoparticle contamination from small trenches in the wafers without damage. Commercialization of this process will aid new developments of more complex silicon wafers.

Background

The current cleaning technique for silicon wafers can cause significant damage to fragile features, and thus, cannot keep up with the industry’s need for more complex designs. The proposed technology could possibly revolutionize the semiconductor industry by allowing wafers to be more intricately designed. It is beneficial to both the semiconductor and technology industry to commercialize a more efficient cleaning technique. In the semiconductor industry, there is an increasing demand for more condensed and complex silicon chips as technology nodes becomes faster and smaller. However, cleaning of these intricate patterned silicon wafers poses a challenge for the manufacturing process.

Advantages

  • Improved cleaning efficiency
  • Commercially viable for microchip manufactures
  • Does not damage silicon wafers fragile features

Applications

  • Semiconductor Industries
  • Technology Industries
  • Industries in the need of Megasonic cleaning such as optics, tools, filters, heat exchangers, and silicon molds.

Inventors

Pierre Deymier

Manish Keswani

Srini Raghavan

Contact

Robert Sleeper

Licensing Manager, College of Engineering

RobertS@tla.arizona.edu

TLA Ofc: 520-626-4604

Refer to Technology UA13-026