Effect of Omni-Gen on Stress Reduction in Lactating Dairy Cows

Technology #ua14-184

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Categories
Researchers
Robert Collier
Professor, Animal and Comparative Biomedical Sciences
James Chapman
Research Director, Prince Agri
Laun Hall
Research Specialist, Animal & Comparative Biomedical Sciences
David Calabotta
New Business Ventures Director
Neil Forsberg
Steven Puntenney
Managed By
Tod McCauley
Sr. Licensing Manager (520) 626-7916

Background

Environmental stress has been shown to have a detrimental effect on the health, production, and reproduction of a variety of livestock species. Dairy cattle and other production animals are especially vulnerable to heat stress, as feed intake, milk production, and reproduction are all decreased during heat stress, while disease prevalence increases. Heat stress has a significant negative impact on dairy cow health and production, and is estimated to cost the American dairy producer up to $1.5 billion annually. Nutrition can play an essential role in the maintenance of an animal’s immune system, productivity, and overall health.

Invention:

The technology provides for a novel method of supplemental nutrition to improve health and production for livestock animals under environmental stress, especially in lactating dairy cattle. During heat stress conditions, dairy cattle had increased feed intake, reduced rectal temperatures, and reduced respiration rates compared to controls.

Application:

The technology can be used as a part of a sound management and nutrition strategy in dairy cattle subject to environmental stress and may be an appropriate cost-effective preventative measure for use in combination with animal vaccination and/or health treatment programs for livestock that are at risk for or have suffered from disease.

Advantages:

The technology may allow for dairy farmers in areas around the world that face from extreme heat conditions to continue to increase milk production and maintain animal health. The invention described may be admixed with feeds or foods, incorporated into pelleted feeds or foods or administered orally.

Lead Inventor:

Dr. Robert Collier