New Therapy to Prevent Venom Induced Coagulopathy

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Researchers
Vance Nielsen
Professor, Anesthesiology
Leslie Boyer
Director, Viper Institute
Managed By
Lisa Lin
Licensing Manager (520) 626-6969

Title: New therapy to prevent venom induced coagulopathy

 

Invention:

The invention is the use of iron and carbon monoxide to increase clot formation after venomous snake bite. Venom exposure impairs the blood’s ability to clot. Serious complications may result in life threatening hemorrhage. This new therapy can be used as a bridging therapy between when the snake bite occurs and when the anti-venom can be given at the hospital.

 

Background:

Venomous snake bites are the greatest cause of human injury and fatality from venomous animals. Venom-induced coagulopathy is one of the common results from snake bites. Toxins deactivate the clotting pathway and eventually prolonged bleeding occurs. The severe hemorrhage can cause the need of amputation or become life-threatening. A cheap and easy treatment to delay the effect of venom in the field is needed.

 

Applications:

• The invention can be used as an adjunct therapy to antivenom

• The invention can be used as bridging therapy to “buy more time” for the snake bite victims as they seek help on getting anti-venom.

• This invention can be included in the first-aid kit for mountain climber.

• This invention can be used for pets as well since more dogs are venomous snake bite victims than humans.

 

Advantages:

• First bridging therapy that can be used in the field before snake bite victims can get anti-venom.

• CO- and iron-releasing agents can be stored at room temperature for a long time

 

Development Stage:

The inventors have in vitro data to show that CO and iron reverse the coagulopathy induced by venom in human plasma. In a rabbit in vivo model, the venom mixed with CO caused less coagulopathy than venom alone. 

 

Related Publications: 

• Nielsen VG, Kirklin JK, Geroge JF. Carbon monoxide-releasing molecule-2 decreases fibrinolysis in human plasma. Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 20, 448-55. (2009).

• Nielsen VG, Pretorius E. Iron and carbon monoxide enhance coagulation and attenuate fibrinolysis by different mechanisms. Bloo Coagul Fibrinolysis. 25, 695-702. (2014).

• Nielsen VG and Boyer LV. Iron and carbon monoxide attenuate degradation of plasmatic coagulation by Crotalus atrox venom. Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 26 (2015). 

• Nielsen VG, Boyer LV, Matika RW, Amos Q, and Redford DT. Iron and carbon monoxide attenuate Crotalus atrox venom-enhanced tissue-type plasminogen activator-initiated fibrinolysis. Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 26 (2015).

• Nielsen VG, Redford DT, and Boyle PK. Effect of iron and carbon monoxide on fibrinogenase-like degradation of plasmatic coagulation by venoms of six Agkistrodon Species. Basic & Clinical Pharmacology &Toxicology. 2015

• Nielsen VG. Iron and carbon monoxide prevent degradation of plasmatic coagulation by thrombin-like activity in rattlesnake venom. Human and Experimental Toxicology. 1-7, 2015

• Nielsen VG, Redford DT, and Boyle PK. Effect of iron and carbon monoxide on fibrinogenase-like degradation of plasmatic coagulation by venoms of four Crotalus Species. Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 26 (2015).