'Hesperaloe Funifera' Germplasm and Fiber Qualities

Technology #ua15-175

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Categories
Researchers
Steven McLaughlin
Professor Emeritus, Arid Lands Studies
Richard Detrick
Joseph Hoffmann
Professor, Arid Lands Studies
Heath Reeves
Howard Gentry
Susan Schuck
Research Technician
Damian Ravetta
Graduate Student
Ryan Williams
Undergraduate student
Managed By
Tod McCauley
Sr. Licensing Manager (520) 626-7916

Title: Hesperaloe fibers for specialty paper

Invention:

This invention provides Hesperaloe germplasm to deriver plants that produce fibers with long, thin, and narrow cell walls, as well as insight into agronomic practices to establish efficient plantations with optimal biomass production.

Background:

In the specialty paper market, performance requirements both for existing and new applications are becoming increasingly demanding, especially as it relates to endurance, enhanced physical performance, and abrasive resistance. Coupled with consumer demands for more eco-friendly products, natural fibers are gaining greater attention and demand is growing for component materials that are durable, reliable, lightweight, and have good mechanical properties that are significantly better than those of traditional wood sources.

Applications:

•       Virgin fiber source for the production of specialty papers, including tea bags, packaging, and filters

•       Composite materials

•       Biochemicals and/or biofuels

Advantages:

•       Specialty paper made with Hesperaloe fibers displayed exceptionally strong tear, tensile, and burst strength, with higher tensile and burst strength compared to abaca and sisal fibers

•       Non-wood plants such as Hesperaloe have been proven as an effective alternative to wood, paper and cellulose pulp imports for developing countries with scant forest resources while also adding value acquired by agrifood residues used for pulping

•       Hesperaloe production is low cost, low density, provides enhanced energy recovery, and CO2 neutrality

•       Hesperaloe fibers are biodegradable and recyclable

Related Publications:

•       Wong, A, and McLaughlin, S (1999). Papermaking pulp from Hesperaloe species, an arid-zone native plant from Nortern Mexico, Biomass: a Growth Opportunity in Gree Energy and Value-Added Products, Vols 1 and 2: 649-654.

Inventor: Steven McLaughlin

Licensing Manager:

Tod McCauley

TodM@tla.arizona.edu

520-621-5000

Technology ID: UA15-175