Interface

Technology #ua16-061

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Categories
Researchers
Marvin Slepian
Professor, Medicine
David Armstrong
Professor, Surgery
Managed By
Rakhi Gibbons
Asst. Director, Life Sciences (520) 626-6695

Title: Sensor Interface for Preventing Tissue Damage

 

Invention: Inventors at the University of Arizona have developed a sensor interface designed to detect and prevent tissue damage. The device is attached to the subject’s skin, senses and identifies regions within the skin-contact surface at risk for damage from these stressors, and then makes adjustments to those regions in order to prevent tissue damage.

 

Background: Tissue damage can result from prolonged exposure to a variety of stressors including pressure, moisture, shear, temperature, pH levels and other factors. A number of topical treatments are used to care for skin damage, but only once the damage has been done. As a means of detecting and preventing tissue damage, Dr. Marvin Slepian has developed a technology that is capable of sensing potential risk for damage via attachment the user. 

 

Applications:

  • Hospital beds and patients prone to bed sores
  • Maintaining temperature via blankets, clothing, etc.
  • Athletic clothing and/or equipment
  • Compression equipment for diabetics

 

Advantages:

  • Capable of detecting stressors that may be damaging to tissues, which prompts a response in order to alleviate them
  • Could help patients with reduced sensation or who have difficulty moving who may be more prone to bedsores or other morbidities
  • Provides a safer and less labor-intensive alternative
  • Capable of taking readings over specific areas of the skin that are most at risk for damage due to certain stressors
  • Stressors can be responded to in a more precise way than would be possible without the sensors
  • Capable of being programmed and then providing data feedback
  • Able to interact with computer systems, including electronic medical records
  • Potential to allow data gathered by the sensor system to be used to fine-tune specific treatments for each patient

 

Licensing Manager: 

Rakhi Gibbons

RakhiG@tla.arizona.edu

(520) 626-6695