Therapeutic Modification of Deubiquitinases

Technology #ua16-200

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Researchers
Ankit Desai
Assistant Professor, Medicine
Joe G.N. Garcia
Professor, Medicine
Managed By
Rakhi Gibbons
Asst. Director, Life Sciences (520) 626-6695

Title: Therapeutic Modification of Deubiquitinases

 

Invention: The present invention identifies deubiquitinase inhibition as a novel therapeutic pathway against cancers and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), which have overlapping pathology.

 

Background: Deubitiquinases (DUBs) can serve as a valid target for drug discovery. The human genome encodes around 100 genes for DUBs, which are involved in a variety of cellular processes. Approximately 79 of them are thought to be functional. DUBs have been shown to control a number of important tumor suppressors in cells such as p53. With that said, DUBs are one of the most valid drug targets in the commercial oncology market. The interest in DUBs as therapeutic targets is further reflected by the impressive number of ongoing efforts to develop and characterize novel DUB inhibitors using innovative strategies, such as chemical synthesis of ubiquitin bioconjugates or phage display-based selection of ubiquitin mutants with enhanced affinity for specific DUBs.

 

Applications:

  • A novel way to degrade harmful proteins that contribute to the development of cancers and pulmonary hypertension, which have overlapping pathology
  • Potential for efficacy across a broad spectrum of diseases including cancer, viral and bacterial pathogenesis, and neurodegenerative disorders

Advantages:

  • The identified deubiquitinase, and its class of deubiquitinases, are responsible for preventing pools of proteins from being degraded
  • Potential to lead to increased success in the treatment of various cancers and other diseases
  • Pharmaceutical companies already recognize the potential of DUB as a drug target.

 

Licensing Manager: 

Rakhi Gibbons

RakhiG@tla.arizona.edu

(520) 626-6695