Characterization of Optimized Chronically Implantable Microsensors for Multitemporal Dopamine Measurements in Rats

Technology #ua17-031

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Researchers
Michael Heien
Associate Professor, Chemistry & Biochemistry
Managed By
Paul Eynott
Sr. Licensing Manager (520) 621-2878

Title: Characterization of Optimized Chronically Implantable Microsensors for Multitemporal Dopamine Measurements in Rats

 

Invention: The invention describes a durable sensor fabricated for use in measuring dopamine in rats. In its current form, the sensor is an implant and can take high temporal resolution snapshots of dopamine levels and changes over increasingly smaller increments of time.

 

Background: Dopamine plays a key role in cognitive function because identifying the concentration and location of dopamine is very important when it comes to neurological diagnoses. Current methods of measuring dopamine levels have been met with some levels of success, but usually lack in the ability to measure dopamine concentrations and suffer from less than stellar temporal resolutions.

 

Applications:

  • Biosensor to measure tonic dopamine levels
  • Diagnostic for use as a marker for neurological anomalies that have known neurotransmitter level reductions or overproductions

 

Advantages:

  • Allows for tonic concentrations to be measured with sub minute temporal resolution
  • Highly durable and selective

 

Licensing Manager:

Paul Eynott

PaulE@tla.arizona.edu

(520) 471-2687