A Microscale Reactor and Method for Small Scale Synthesis and Rapid Screening Conditions for the Preparation of Inorganic Nanocrystals, Heterostructured Nanomaterials and Colloidal Materials

Technology #ua17-040

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Researchers
Nicholas Pavlopoulos
Graduate student, CBC
Dong-Chul (Jeffrey) Pyun
Professor, Chemistry & Biochemistry
Managed By
Paul Eynott
Sr. Licensing Manager (520) 621-2878

Title: A Microscale Reactor and Method for Small Scall Synthesis and Rapid Screening Conditions for the Preparation of Inorganic Nanocrystals, Heterostructured Nanomaterials, and Colloidal Materials

 

Invention: The invention is a system for synthesizing a material in a microscale process. This system is comprised of a microreactor vessel with one or more ports configured for receiving reagents and venting, a particulate-filled heating mantle with a cavity configured to hold the microreactor vessel, and a grinder for grinding solid reagents.

 

Background: Developing reliable and reproducible methods for reaction processes is often a technical challenge. A large scale process would usually require long wait times during a heating and cooling cycle of the process. The reaction may take a few hours to equilibrate at very high temperatures, and a few more hours to cool to room temperature. If an error occurs during this large-scale reaction, for instance, if the reaction is a multi-step process, then not only is a significant amount of material wasted, but there is also an undesirable loss of time and expenses. Moreover, these large-scale reactions often require the use of a traditional thermocoupled heating mantle, which in itself can also have problems due to the thermocouple.

 

Applications:

  • More effective synthesis of material
  • Photochemistry
  • Electrosynthesis
  • Multicomponent reactions and polymerization (ex. butyl acrylate)

 

Advantages:

  • Small scale and reliable heating/cooling and mixing
  • Uniform delivery of reagents at microscale sizes
  • A universal process that is applicable to a broad range of inorganic nanocrystal materials
  • Focuses on the preparation of semiconductor nanocrystals possessing desirable optical and optoelectronic properties based on “Quantum Dots”

 

Licensing Manager:

Paul Eynott

PaulE@tla.arizona.edu

(520) 471-2687