Blue-Enhancer Glasses

Case ID:
UA21-175
Invention:

Because of the huge increase in the amount of blue light consumed by the average individual due to myriad factors including society’s dependence on phones, tablets, and computers, blue light blocking glasses are becoming commonplace. Not only do blue light suppressing glasses decrease some of the stress on an individuals’ eyes, but the decrease in blue light staves off another side effect of blue light consumption: a decrease in melatonin production. This invention performs the opposite function, increasing levels of blue light in the morning thereby staving off melatonin production, strengthening the circadian system, and leading to stronger, healthier circadian rhythms. 

Background:
The idea that an individual’s mood and health are related to the amount of light exposure is not a new one; however, the medical industry’s understanding of its various wavelengths and uses has grown, and continues to grow in recent years.

In the past few decades especially, the industrialized world continues to try and squeeze more and more productivity out of a 24 hour period. Perhaps even more troubling is the increase in sleep disorders which, in some cases, are up 64% from 2013 to 2016. It seems that as individuals spend more time, especially at night, on screens or looking at blue light, the circadian rhythms have been substantially altered. This alteration makes melatonin production more difficult during the night/evening. So far, new products, research, and ideas tend to favor blocking blue light at night to increase melatonin production. However, the circadian rhythm is more affected at all times during the day which would lead to the conclusion that the few hours just after waking up are just as important as those few hours before going to sleep.

Applications:

  • In conjunction with light therapy
  • Daily personal use


Advantages:

  • Ease of use
  • Inexpensive
Patent Information:
Contact For More Information:
Jace Langen
Licensing Manager
The University of Arizona
JaceL@tla.arizona.edu
Lead Inventor(s):
Michael Grandner
Brooke Mason
Fabian Fernandez
Stanley Pau
Keywords: